Friday, September 12, 2014

"MULLIGANS"

I've been told not to do it.  Don't re-work a painting.  Let it be.  I've been told you can't improve them. Huh? I've been told, it isn't "plein air".  So,…what?  Sorry, I can't resist.  Sometimes, after I've "finished" a painting, I start seeing things I'd like to do to it.  I want to simplify something, tune-up the color, emphasize the focal area, or any number of things that I recognize as making it a better painting, and learning something.  Sure, I could paint it again on another day, and I've done plenty of that.  But, that's different.  That's another painting.  That one will have it's own needs. I'm talking about when a particular painting is working for me on a number of levels, but I'd like to see some changes.  Why not!?  They're my paintings, and I make the rules.

This one was re-cropped from its original 11x14 down to 9x12.  In my mind, composition was improved immediately.  It originally was done in a cool color scheme, and it wasn't "bad", but it seemed a bit lifeless.  I decided to warm it up and control the color relationships for more atmosphere, contrast, and a different feel.

Here's the original.  Some of you may be saying, "Ooh…too bad.  You lost it."  Well, I had a lot of fun re-doing it.  I learned some things, and …I prefer the new result to the original.  My point is, it's not a contest.  It's about trying anything that I think will make a painting better. Sometimes, a mulligan is just what's needed to get back on track.

ON SECOND THOUGHT
©Jimmy Longacre 2014
9X12 oil on canvas panel

Jimmy Longacre
subjective realist landscape paintings

MY WEBSITE
MY BLOG: Paintbox & Easel

GALLERY LINKS
River's Edge Gallery Kerrville TX
Mustang Island Art Gallery Port Aransas TX
Capital Fine Art Gallery Austin TX

Wednesday, September 10, 2014

PERSEVERANCE

Here is another exercise in trying to tame a subject that is  a bit more complex than I like.  The exercise is worthwhile because it requires careful planning of shapes and values to avoid visual chaos. I try to work things down to no more than 3 to 5 major shapes.  It's dangerously easy to get caught painting "things" in a scene like this, instead of simple shapes, values, color and edges.  This one crashed and burned twice before I was satisfied with the study.  If you just quit because it isn't working out, you don't learn much.  Perseverance always pays in future dividends.

PERSIMMON AND PRICKLY PEAR
©Jimmy Longacre 2014
16X20 oil on canvas panel

Jimmy Longacre
subjective realist landscape paintings

MY WEBSITE
MY BLOG: Paintbox & Easel

GALLERY LINKS
River's Edge Gallery Kerrville TX
Mustang Island Art Gallery Port Aransas TX
Capital Fine Art Gallery Austin TX

Sunday, September 7, 2014

STEP-BY-STEP_ON A BROKEN LEDGE

Here is an abbreviated step-by-step of my procedure on this painting.  I don't always use the exact same process.  The subject and my objective usually dictate how I will begin and develop a painting.  This, however, is very characteristic of usual thinking.

1_The B&W is my NOTAN.  It's usually smaller than a 3x3 area, and done in my little 4x6 sketchbook that goes everywhere with me.  (One of my chief "art-o-vision" tools).  I like to use TOMBO brush pens, N65 for mid-value and N15 for my dark group. This is always my first physical step to doing a painting.  I think of these as little paintings, not sketches.  I've used pencil in the past, but I have a tendency to get "to cute" with what can be suggested with that tool.  I'm only after the most basic arrangement of my idea for the distribution of light, mid-value and shade.  Below the notan, you see my basic color idea that I'll use.  Often I'll only use one tube color for each hue, plus black and white.  It's a great way to develop mixing skill, and explore possible  color harmonies.
 2_My basic lay-in is done with a transparent, neutral mix of my dominant hue choice.  I like Liquin for this.  No white.  In this step, I'm just establishing my big division of light and dark into a pattern that interests me.  I'll usually wipe-out the light areas.
3_I like block-in my major shapes by indicating their relative values and temperatures.  I'm not very concerned about hue at this point, as long as it somewhat over-states the temperature relationships.  That's fun to paint on top of in coming stages.


 4_Here, I'm concerned with more clearly defining the overall value range and relationship of the shapes. I'm still not concerned with creating any defined edges at this point, and I'd rather they stay pretty soft everywhere until I'm ready to develop my focal area.
5_Next, I pre-mix a few of the colors for the major shapes, with fairly close attention to value groups, and a move toward the influence of local color.  I use the color in the scene as a guide, or suggestion, for the colors I will use in the painting, where I'm more interested in having fun with the harmony of my chosen hues.

6_In the finishing stage, I bring up a bit of detail mainly in the general focal area.  I'm paying close attention to edge relationships, cohesive value groups, developing my color idea, enjoying the quality of the paint, and some final touches of accent colors, hi-light and accent, and one or two crisp edges at the focal point.

ON A BROKEN LEDGE
©Jimmy Longacre 2014
16X20 oil on canvas panel

Jimmy Longacre
subjective realist landscape paintings



GALLERY LINKS
Capital Fine Art Gallery Austin TX 

Friday, September 5, 2014

SELECTION: SIMPLE IS BETTER

This one is pushing the limits for how much I like to put into a composition.  When I'm deciding on what to paint, I try to keep this in mind:  Choose something that you can radically simplify, and visualize as a finished painting.  It doesn't take a lot to overwhelm me.  So, I try to make sure I've chosen one "star of the show" and eliminated anything extraneous that happens to be in the scene before me.  For instance there was a bunch of interesting rock and deadwood in the foreground, but I decided to ignore it in favor of keeping the idea simple.

PEACEFUL AS IT GETS
©Jimmy Longacre 2014
??x?? oil on canvas panel

Jimmy Longacre
subjective realist landscape paintings

MY WEBSITE
MY BLOG: Paintbox & Easel

GALLERY LINKS
River's Edge Gallery Kerrville TX
Mustang Island Art Gallery Port Aransas TX
Capital Fine Art Gallery Austin TX

Wednesday, September 3, 2014

TIME TO PAINT!

It's good to get back to painting!  I've been preparing a PowerPoint presentation for my workshop in San Angelo this month.  The workshop will focus on "Spontaneity and Improvisation in Painting".  I'm really looking forward to working with the group on the concepts and exercises that have made painting more and more fun for me.  I just heard today that it has sold out.

ON A BROKEN LEDGE
©Jimmy Longacre 2014
16X20 oil on canvas panel

Jimmy Longacre
subjective realist landscape paintings

MY WEBSITE
MY BLOG: Paintbox & Easel

GALLERY LINKS
River's Edge Gallery Kerrville TX
Mustang Island Art Gallery Port Aransas TX
Capital Fine Art Gallery Austin TX